FREE Tutorial: How we make fondant roses

Carl ThompsonDavids Cake Craft

Davids Cake Craft free flower making tutorials

David’s Cake Craft in association with Kelmy presents a FREE fondant rose making tutorial with 20 detailed step by step photos

The commercial bakery approach

David’s Cake Craft approach to flower making embraces traditional old school free hand / freestyle cake decorating techniques creating hand crafted flowers quickly and effectively

With over twenty five years of commercial bakery cake decorating experience at David Cakes retail store in Liverpool, England UK,  David’s teaching assistant Edward shares trade secrets, showing how he creates beautiful blooms with Kelmy fondant, using centuries old free-hand / free style flower making techniques.

Davids Cake Craft presents Kelmy

Edward says “When I look at a real rose I see so many petals, so I never worry about counting how many petals I attach to a fondant rose. For me it is about the finished flower looking natural and varied in its bloom formation, just as it does in real life.”

With a pair of scissors at hand, Edward simply uses his fingers to create roses that can be decorated onto a wedding or celebration cake.

Suggestions on preparing your fondant

As the technique demonstrated embraces the old school bakery approach realistically we have to experiment to find out which way achieves the best results.

Where we are in the world, our climate and humidity will ultimately have an affect on the outcome of our creativity.

We can use either ready-made coloured fondant or add a drop of food colour (liquid or gel) to white fondant to make a pale colour. If we want to make vibrant coloured roses, we may be best using ready-made coloured fondant otherwise having to add so much colour could create issues with regards to the stability of our fondant.

Addressing ambient temperature

Once Edward removes the fondant from the packaging, he starts moulding the amount he requires between his fingers.

If the surrounding air temperature is cold, the heat of his hands will soften the fondant.

If the surrounding air temperature is hot, the fondant will soften quicker, so we could add tylo powder, but be aware it will set the fondant quicker and if we add too much, it could result in cracks appearing as he models our rose petals.

Another option would be to run our hands under cold water, then dry them and then start the moulding procedure so cooling down the fondant as the petal is created.

Also we may wish to lightly dust our fingertips with icing sugar or cornstarch if our hands are hot.

Right or left handed ? 

Edward is right handed but uses his left hand to smooth out the fondant petal.

There again we have to use which ever hand we find most comfortable to create with, in order to achieve the desired results.

There are so many options and at the end of the day we believe there are no rules.

Find out what works best for you and have fun creating !

So let’s create free-hand / freestyle

How to make fondant roses

Step 1 – Mould a small piece of fondant into a ball shape.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 2 – Flatten with the palm of your hands.

 

How to make fondant roses with Kelmy

Step 3 – Place the flattened piece of fondant between your fingers  and thumb.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 4 – Start lightly pressing and smoothing the edge of the fondant with your fingers

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 5 – Continue the technique to fan out the petal shape.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 6 – Spiral the petal to form the centre of the rose

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 7 –  To create the next petal repeat steps 1 to 5, then start to wrap the newly shaped petal around the spiralled fondant base.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 8 – Continue wrapping the newly shaped petal around the spiralled fondant base.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 9 – Then Overlap the petal to form a simple rosebud.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 10 – To create the next petal repeat steps 1 to 5, then wrap the newly shaped petal around the fondant rose bud base.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 11 –  Repeat steps 1 to 5, then wrap another newly shaped petal around the rose.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 12 – Secure the petal at the base of the rose by applying  gentle pressure to the fondant.

 

David Cakes flower making tutorial

Step 13 – Continue to add more petals until you have created your desired size rose bloom.

 

David Cakes flower making tutorial

Step 14 –  Secure the petal at the base of the rose by applying gentle pressure to the fondant.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 15 –  Once you have created your desired size rose, gently squeeze the base of the rose with your fingers and thumbs to stop your flower petals from separating.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 16 –  Once you have created your desired size rose, simply take a pair of scissors and carefully cut off the excess fondant from the base of the flower.

 

How to make fondant roses

Step 17 –  Secure your roses onto your cake with Royal icing piped leaves to complete the final cascading design.

Thoughts when making roses for our retail cake store business

Having been creatively involved with David Cakes of Distinction retail business for over 25 years, Edward says “When there are 20 wedding cakes a week to produce, each decorated with over 30 fondant roses, realistically you have to work quickly in order to fulfil the commissions. By applying this free-hand / freestyle rose making technique meant David Cakes could produce beautifully decorated cakes quickly and effectively but also make the creative flower making process profitable in our retail business ! “

Quick ways to add colour-shade effects to our roses

We can make our roses with white fondant then apply just one or many shades of food colouring colour using an airbrush.

Alternatively, we can create full bloom roses with 2 different shades of fondant, mixing them together just enough to result in a variegated effect to your finished rose petals

Additional decorative ideas

When decorating a cake with a posy or cascade of larger blooming fondant roses, we can also place tiny rosebuds around the roses as additional fillers and also enhance the floral display with rose bud detailing.

Did you know?

We can secure our rose petals to the rosebud with a simple squeeze of the fingers, positioned at the base of the petal. we can also apply a spot of moisture with artists paintbrush that has been dipped in water. This will act like a glue to assist in securing the petal to the rose bud.

David’s Cake Craft is the exclusive UK importer and UK distributor of Kelmy products

In 2016 David’s Cake Craft became the exclusive UK importer and UK distributor of Kelmy products which are now available for purchase through our online store

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Free tutorial

Check out David’s Cake Craft in association with Kelmy – FREE step by step fondant rose making video tutorials

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